Middleport’s Fire Bell Memorial

In a moving ceremony attended by many of our local residents, the Fire Bell Memorial was rededicated this past Memorial Day 2016. The Middleport Fire Department first dedicated their bell memorial in the park on Memorial Day of 1952 in  honor of  the deceased members of the department. The bell used to hang in a tower behind the old fire hall, now better knows to residents as our Village Hall.  After a fire in 1898 that engulfed the tower and the bell, the village lost their alarm system. According to Anna Wallace’s History of Middleport, the bell tower of the Episcopal Church was then used for ringing fire alarms at a cost to the village of $25 per year. In this view of the old Haines More Info »

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Middleport Universalist Church

It was back in April of 1841 that the Middleport Universalists organized their church on a piece of land donated by John Craig. The building of the church was accomplished with smooth, egg shaped stones gathered by the congregation from the shore of Lake Ontario and under the supervision of stone mason Emery Smith. Reverend Linus Everett was chosen to dedicate the church in 1842. In 1870 the Middleport Church was valued at $8 thousand dollars with the only church bell withing the village as well as the first organ. Due to diminished membership, the church closed its doors in 2015 and the building was sold. Many of their books and some other artifacts were donated to the office of the Village Historian, and are More Info »

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Middleport’s Grand Hotel

As early as 1825, the corner of Main and State Street in Middleport was known for its stately hotel, then called the Pierce House.  One of the finest establishments in the area, it provided a home away from home for many a traveler who passed through this area. After a fire in 1883, the original wooden building was replaced in 1884 by one made of brick by the new owner, A.D. Rich.  The new building was 118 feet long, 47 feet wide and three stories high. The main floor had a large dining room, billiard and bar room and offices. Upstairs were large sleeping apartments some of which provided a starting home for many local young married couples. After several more proprietors, the building was More Info »

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Hotel Pierce to Cornerstone Credit Union

The corner of Main and State Street in Middleport started with its first hotel in 1825 when Horace Pierce built what was then known as the Pierce House.  In 1883 it burned to the ground and the property was purchased by Asa Rich, who replaced it with a brick structure known as the Hotel Rich. Mr. Rich kept a team of horses and a wagon at the train depot so that customers could be brought to his hotel in style.   It had several more owners until it was purchased by George Fenton who renamed it the Fenton Hotel. This beautiful structure met its demise in 1966 when it was torn down to make way for a gas station.  The clock from the hotel was More Info »

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Middleport’s Opera House

by Anna Wallace, Former Village Historian The early Opera Houses were the major activity and entertainment centers for their communities. The first one here was Compton’s Opera House on Main Street, where the old theater, as and where the dentist office is located now. It burned in 1876. I’ve not learned just when the Opera House on State Street was built. In 1886 it was known as the VanDyke Opera House, owned by Robert Davison and managed by J. VanDyke. The following year management, as by J. E. Cooper, who later established the Middleport Herald (newspaper) and Myron S. Pike. More dressing rooms were added, more chairs purchased, and the box office was relocated at the head of the stairs. From an early post card More Info »

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The old mill on Mill Street in Middleport NY

The four-story stone flour mill stood at the southwest corner of Hartland Street and Sherman Road for 132 years. The mill, built by Buel Barnes and powered by a water wheel, was demolished in 1988. Buel Barnes had owned a flourmill on the canal towpath, and in 1856 built the “Lower Mills”, or the “Hartland Mills”, dealing in wholesale and retail sales. In 1887 he began shipping his flour in barrels, as cooper George Smith was making a very tight, smooth barrel, fastened with a locking rack-hoop, requiring no nails. Barnes was one of the oldest millers in the state, having been in business since 1842, making a high grade of family flour. After Barnes died in 1896 the mill was operated by John F. More Info »

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Fire damages heart of Village

A Saturday evening in July 1999 brought eight fire companies and 100 firefighters to Main and State Streets to fight what would become a seven hour long battle. The fire, which started 2 State Street, quickly spread through 4 State Street and then to an adjacent building at 17 Main Street. Heavy smoke billowed from the second story windows causing major damage to all the buildings. Several firefighters sustained minor injuries but were later released from Medina Memorial Hospital.The Jones Hardware store sustained heavy damage but fortunately Jones had vacated the apartment above the store just the week before. A grassroots organization worked hard to get that building renovated and today it houses the comfortable and popular Alternative Grounds Caffe. Watch a video of shots More Info »

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